Virginia Citizens Defense League, Inc.
, P.O. Box 513, Newington, VA 22122
804-639-0600 • 703-372-3285 • 757-271-3705 • 540-446-5783

VCDL 2022 Legislation Tracking Tool

Bills We Strongly Support

 
Bill Summary Bill Status
SB758      Patron: Todd E. Pillion  -  all patrons                                       
Selling or possessing switchblade. Eliminates the prohibition for selling, bartering, giving, furnishing, or possessing with the intent of selling, bartering, giving, or furnishing a switchblade.



VCDL Comments
This bill legalizes the possession of switchblades knives.
01/21/22  Senate: Presented and ordered printed 22103908D
01/21/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on the Judiciary
02/09/22  Senate: Reported from Judiciary (13-Y 0-N)
02/10/22  Senate: Constitutional reading dispensed (40-Y 0-N)
02/11/22  Senate: Read second time and engrossed
02/11/22  Senate: Constitutional reading dispensed (40-Y 0-N)
02/11/22  Senate: Passed Senate (40-Y 0-N)
02/22/22  House: Placed on Calendar
02/22/22  House: Read first time
02/22/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/25/22  House: Reported from Public Safety (21-Y 1-N)
03/01/22  House: Read second time
03/02/22  House: Read third time
03/02/22  House: Passed House (96-Y 3-N)
03/02/22  House: VOTE: Passage (96-Y 3-N)
03/03/22  Senate: Enrolled
03/03/22  Senate: Bill text as passed Senate and House (SB758ER)
03/03/22  Senate: Signed by President
03/03/22  House: Signed by Speaker
03/04/22  Senate: Enrolled Bill Communicated to Governor on March 4, 2022
03/04/22  Governor: Governor's Action Deadline 11:59 p.m., March 11, 2022
03/11/22  Governor: Approved by Governor-Chapter 27 (effective 7/1/22)
03/11/22  Governor: Acts of Assembly Chapter text (CHAP0027)
 
Bills We Support

 
Bill Summary Bill Status
 
Bills We Strongly Oppose

 
Bill Summary Bill Status
 
Bills We Oppose

 
Bill Summary Bill Status
 
Bills We Are Currently Neutral On

 
Bill Summary Bill Status
 
Bills That Have Been Rolled Into Other Bills, Continued to Next Year, Withdrawn or Killed

 
Bill Summary Bill Status
HB188      Patron: John J. McGuire, III  -  all patrons                                       
Carrying dangerous weapon to place of religious worship; repeal. Repeals the prohibition on the carrying of dangerous weapons in a place of worship without good and sufficient reason while a meeting for religious purposes is being held at such place.



VCDL Comments
This bill repeals the ban on the carrying of firearms in a church "without good and sufficient reason." Government should not be in the business of telling private property owners how to handle their security. A longstanding Virginia Attorney General opinion says that those carrying a firearm for self-defense in a church have a good and sufficient reason. However, this law is unnecessary as churches can already ban the carry of firearms under Virginia's trespass laws, just like any other private property. And there is a stricter legal penalty for a trespass violation (Class 1 misdemeanor) than carrying without a good and sufficient reason (Class 4 misdemeanor).
01/10/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22103059D
01/10/22  House: Referred to Committee on Rules
02/15/22  House: Left in Rules
 
HB204      Patron: H. Otto Wachsmann, Jr.  -  all patrons                                       
Sale and transfer of firearms; criminal history record information check delay. Decreases from five business days to three business days the time provided for the Department of State Police to complete a background check before a firearm may be transferred. If a dealer who has otherwise fulfilled all requirements is told by the State Police that a response will not be available by the end of the dealer's third business day, the dealer may complete the sale or transfer without being deemed in violation.



VCDL Comments
This bill changes the number of days that the state can delay a firearm transfer from five days to three days, matching federal law.
01/10/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22102442D
01/10/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/01/22  House: Assigned PS sub: Subcommittee #1
02/03/22  House: Subcommittee recommends reporting (6-Y 4-N)
02/04/22  House: Reported from Public Safety (12-Y 10-N)
02/08/22  House: Read first time
02/09/22  House: Read second time and engrossed
02/10/22  House: Read third time and passed House (51-Y 48-N)
02/10/22  House: VOTE: Passage (51-Y 48-N)
02/11/22  Senate: Constitutional reading dispensed
02/11/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on the Judiciary
02/28/22  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Judiciary (9-Y 6-N)
 
HB292      Patron: Nicholas J. Freitas  -  all patrons                                       
Concealed handgun permits; demonstration of competence. Removes the requirement that concealed handgun permit applicants demonstrate competence with a handgun by completing an in-person course and adds the option for applicants to demonstrate competence by completing an electronic, video, or online course conducted by a state-certified or National Rifle Association-certified firearms instructor.



VCDL Comments
This bill reinstates online training for getting a concealed handgun permit. There were no issues with online training before the option was removed in 2020. Online training is useful for someone who has suddenly developed an urgent need to carry concealed for their personal safety, as it could trim weeks off the time to get a permit. Last year's COVID situation demonstrated the necessity for an online training option.
01/11/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22102063D
01/11/22  House: Referred to Committee on Rules
02/15/22  House: Left in Rules
 
HB299      Patron: Nicholas J. Freitas  -  all patrons                                       
Purchase of handguns; limitation on handgun purchases. Removes the prohibition on any person who is not a licensed firearms dealer from purchasing more than one handgun in a 30-day period. Current law makes it a Class 1 misdemeanor for a violation of this provision, subject to certain exemptions.



VCDL Comments
This bill repeals Virginia's One Handgun a Month arbitrary gun-rationing scheme. Federal law already requires gun dealers to report to the BATFE any repeated handgun-sales made to the same individual during any five-day period.
01/11/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22102181D
01/11/22  House: Referred to Committee on Rules
02/15/22  House: Left in Rules
 
HB325      Patron: Nicholas J. Freitas  -  all patrons                                       
Reporting lost or stolen firearms; civil penalty. Repeals the requirement that, if a firearm is lost or stolen from a person who lawfully possessed it, such person shall report the loss or theft of the firearm to any local law-enforcement agency or the Department of State Police within 48 hours after such person discovers the loss or theft or is informed by a person with personal knowledge of the loss or theft. Under current law, a violation is punishable by a civil penalty of not more than $250.



VCDL Comments
This bill repeals the requirement that a person who has their gun stolen must report it within 48 hours after the person discovers the loss. This law is unenforceable, as how does the Commonwealth know when a person discovered their gun missing, if they realized it at all? The person has already suffered a loss and the Commonwealth want to punish them further for not reporting it within a certain timeframe.
01/11/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22102189D
01/11/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/01/22  House: Assigned PS sub: Subcommittee #1
02/03/22  House: Subcommittee recommends reporting (6-Y 4-N)
02/04/22  House: Reported from Public Safety (12-Y 10-N)
02/08/22  House: Read first time
02/09/22  House: Read second time and engrossed
02/10/22  House: Read third time and passed House (51-Y 48-N)
02/10/22  House: VOTE: Passage (51-Y 48-N)
02/11/22  Senate: Constitutional reading dispensed
02/11/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on the Judiciary
02/28/22  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Judiciary (8-Y 7-N)
 
SB330      Patron: Bryce E. Reeves  -  all patrons                                       
Carrying a concealed handgun; permit not required. Allows any person who is otherwise eligible to obtain a concealed handgun permit to carry a concealed handgun without a permit anywhere he may lawfully carry a handgun openly within the Commonwealth.



VCDL Comments
This bill is a Constitutional Carry bill. It allows someone without a concealed handgun permit, but who would qualify for one, to carry a concealed handgun anywhere they could lawfully open carry a handgun. Twenty-one states now have Constitutional Carry, none have repealed it, and more states are expected to follow suit this year. Neighboring Kentucky, Tennessee and West Virginia are Constitutional Carry states.
01/11/22  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22101962D
01/11/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on the Judiciary
01/26/22  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Judiciary (8-Y 6-N)
 
SB364      Patron: Bryce E. Reeves  -  all patrons                                       

Purchase of handguns; limitation on handgun purchases. Removes the prohibition on any person who is not a licensed firearms dealer from purchasing more than one handgun in a 30-day period. Current law makes it a Class 1 misdemeanor for a violation of this provision, subject to certain exemptions.



VCDL Comments
This bill repeals Virginia's One Handgun a Month arbitrary gun-rationing scheme. Federal law already requires gun dealers to report to the BATFE any repeated handgun-sales made to the same individual during any five-day period.
01/11/22  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22103162D
01/11/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on the Judiciary
01/26/22  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Judiciary (8-Y 6-N)
 
HB391      Patron: Nicholas J. Freitas  -  all patrons                                       
Certain school board property; establishment of gun-free zone permitted. Removes the authority of any school board to deem any non-school zone building or property that it owns or leases where employees of such school board are regularly present for the purpose of performing their official duties as a gun-free zone. Under current law, any school board may prohibit any individual, subject to exceptions, from knowingly possessing, purchasing, transferring, carrying, storing, or transporting firearms, ammunition, or components or combination thereof while such individual is upon such property.



VCDL Comments
This bill repeals the authority of school boards to prohibit firearms on their property. There have been no issues with the lawful carry of firearms on school board property.
01/11/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22102185D
01/11/22  House: Referred to Committee on Education
01/31/22  House: Assigned Education sub: K-12
02/15/22  House: Left in Education
 
HB288      Patron: Nicholas J. Freitas  -  all patrons                                       
Carrying a concealed handgun; permit not required. Allows any person who is otherwise eligible to obtain a concealed handgun permit to carry a concealed handgun without a permit anywhere he may lawfully carry a handgun openly within the Commonwealth.



VCDL Comments
This bill is a Constitutional Carry bill. It allows someone without a concealed handgun permit, but who would qualify for one, to carry a concealed handgun anywhere they could lawfully open carry a handgun. Twenty-one states now have Constitutional Carry, none have repealed it, and more states are expected to follow suit this year. Neighboring Kentucky, Tennessee and West Virginia are Constitutional Carry states.
01/11/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22100089D
01/11/22  House: Referred to Committee on Rules
02/15/22  House: Left in Rules
 
HB10      Patron: Timothy V. Anderson  -  all patrons                                       
Fees for resident concealed handgun permits. Eliminates the fees that may be charged for the processing of an application for or issuing of a resident concealed handgun permit, including any costs associated with the clerk's consultation with law-enforcement agencies.



VCDL Comments
This bill removes all fees for a person to get a concealed handgun permit (CHP). It's bad enough that gun owners need a permit to exercise their right to self-defense using a concealed handgun, they certainly shouldn't have to pay a fee to do so. The fee is similar to a "poll tax."
12/17/21  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22100793D
12/17/21  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/01/22  House: Assigned PS sub: Subcommittee #1
02/03/22  House: Subcommittee recommends reporting (9-Y 1-N)
02/03/22  House: Subcommittee recommends referring to Committee on Appropriations
02/04/22  House: Reported from Public Safety (12-Y 10-N)
02/04/22  House: Referred to Committee on Appropriations
02/15/22  House: Left in Appropriations
 
HB11      Patron: Timothy V. Anderson  -  all patrons                                       
Concealed handgun permits; penalties. Changes the penalty for a first violation of carrying a concealed weapon without a permit from a Class 1 misdemeanor to a civil penalty of not more than $100, a second violation from a Class 6 felony to a Class 2 misdemeanor, and a third or subsequent violation from a Class 5 felony to a Class 1 misdemeanor. The bill also provides that a person, unless otherwise disqualified, shall not be precluded from applying for a concealed handgun permit during the pendency of the proceedings for a violation. If such person is issued a valid concealed handgun permit while a charge for a violation is pending, he may offer such permit to the court, and the court may dismiss the charge.



VCDL Comments
This bill reduces the penalties for carrying a concealed handgun without a CHP. The first offense is up to a $100 civil penalty, which avoids criminalizing someone who is innocently carrying a concealed handgun and is unaware of the requirement for a CHP or is unaware the method of carry is considered 'concealed.' The second offense is raised to a Class 2 misdemeanor, and subsequent offenses are a Class 1 misdemeanor. If a person acquires a valid CHP while awaiting trial, which the bill allows for, the judge may dismiss the charge.
12/17/21  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22100800D
12/17/21  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/01/22  House: Assigned PS sub: Subcommittee #1
02/03/22  House: Subcommittee recommends reporting (7-Y 3-N)
02/04/22  House: Reported from Public Safety (13-Y 9-N)
02/08/22  House: Read first time
02/09/22  House: Passed by for the day
02/10/22  House: Read second time and engrossed
02/11/22  House: Read third time and passed House (53-Y 46-N)
02/11/22  House: VOTE: Passage (53-Y 46-N)
02/14/22  Senate: Constitutional reading dispensed
02/14/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on the Judiciary
02/21/22  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Judiciary (10-Y 5-N)
 
HB14      Patron: Timothy V. Anderson  -  all patrons                                       
Purchase of handguns; limitation on handgun purchases. Removes the prohibition on any person who is not a licensed firearms dealer from purchasing more than one handgun in a 30-day period. Current law makes it a Class 1 misdemeanor for a violation of this provision, subject to certain exemptions.



VCDL Comments
This bill repeals Virginia's One Handgun a Month arbitrary gun-rationing scheme. Federal law already requires gun dealers to report to the BATFE any repeated handgun-sales made to the same individual during any five-day period.
12/20/21  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22100807D
12/20/21  House: Referred to Committee on Rules
02/15/22  House: Left in Rules
 
HB23      Patron: Wendell S. Walker  -  all patrons                                       
Carrying dangerous weapon to place of religious worship; repeal. Repeals the prohibition on the carrying of dangerous weapons in a place of worship without good and sufficient reason while a meeting for religious purposes is being held at such place.



VCDL Comments
This bill repeals the ban on the carrying of firearms in a church "without good and sufficient reason." Government should not be in the business of telling private property owners how to handle their security. A longstanding Virginia Attorney General opinion says that those carrying a firearm for self-defense in a church have a good and sufficient reason. However, this law is unnecessary as churches can already ban the carry of firearms under Virginia's trespass laws, just like any other private property. And there is a stricter legal penalty for a trespass violation (Class 1 misdemeanor) than carrying without a good and sufficient reason (Class 4 misdemeanor).
12/27/21  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22100431D
12/27/21  House: Referred to Committee on Rules
02/15/22  House: Left in Rules
 
HB1306      Patron: Marcus B. Simon  -  all patrons                                       

Removing, altering, etc., serial number on firearm; selling, giving, etc., or possessing firearm with removed, altered, etc., serial number; penalty. Makes it a Class 1 misdemeanor for any person, firm, association, or corporation to knowingly possess any pistol, shotgun, rifle, machine gun, or any other firearm that has a serial number that has been removed, altered, changed, destroyed, or obliterated in any manner. The bill also makes it a Class 1 misdemeanor for any person, firm, association, or corporation to sell, give, or distribute any pistol, shotgun, rifle, machine gun, or other firearm that has a serial number that has been removed, defaced, altered, changed, destroyed, or obliterated in any manner. The bill contains a reenactment clause.



VCDL Comments
This bill corrects several issues with current law regarding serial numbers and allows guns with serial numbers unlawfully removed or defaced to be prosecuted in Virginia.
01/21/22  House: Presented and ordered printed 22104748D
01/21/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/01/22  House: Assigned PS sub: Subcommittee #1
02/03/22  House: Subcommittee recommends reporting with substitute (6-Y 3-N)
02/04/22  House: Reported from Public Safety with substitute (17-Y 4-N)
02/04/22  House: Committee substitute printed 22105993D-H1
02/08/22  House: Read first time
02/09/22  House: Read second time
02/09/22  House: Committee substitute agreed to 22105993D-H1
02/09/22  House: Engrossed by House - committee substitute HB1306H1
02/10/22  House: Engrossment reconsidered by House
02/10/22  House: Amendment by Delegate Simon agreed to
02/10/22  House: Engrossed by House - committee substitute with amendment HB1306EH1
02/10/22  House: Printed as engrossed 22105993D-EH1
02/11/22  House: Read third time and passed House (94-Y 3-N 1-A)
02/11/22  House: VOTE: Passage (94-Y 3-N 1-A)
02/14/22  Senate: Constitutional reading dispensed
02/14/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on the Judiciary
02/21/22  Senate: Reported from Judiciary with substitute (9-Y 6-N)
02/21/22  Senate: Committee substitute printed 22106765D-S1
02/22/22  Senate: Constitutional reading dispensed (40-Y 0-N)
02/23/22  Senate: Read third time
02/23/22  Senate: Reading of substitute waived
02/23/22  Senate: Committee substitute agreed to 22106765D-S1
02/23/22  Senate: Engrossed by Senate - committee substitute HB1306S1
02/23/22  Senate: Passed Senate with substitute (21-Y 18-N 1-A)
02/25/22  House: Senate substitute rejected by House 22106765D-S1 (0-Y 99-N)
02/25/22  House: VOTE: Rejected (0-Y 99-N)
03/01/22  Senate: Senate insisted on substitute (31-Y 9-N)
03/01/22  Senate: Senate requested conference committee
03/02/22  House: House acceded to request
03/03/22  Senate: Conferees appointed by Senate
03/03/22  Senate: Senators: Ebbin, McClellan, Stanley
03/07/22  House: Conferees appointed by House
03/07/22  House: Delegates: Simon, Freitas, Cordoza
03/12/22  House: Continued to 2022 Sp. Sess. 1 pursuant to HJR455
 
SB643      Patron: Adam P. Ebbin  -  all patrons                                       

Removing, altering, etc., serial number on firearm; selling, giving, etc., or possessing firearm with removed, altered, etc., serial number; penalty. Makes it a Class 1 misdemeanor for any person, firm, association, or corporation to knowingly possess any pistol, shotgun, rifle, machine gun, or any other firearm, except for an antique firearm, that has a serial number that has been removed, altered, changed, destroyed, or obliterated in any manner. The bill also makes it a Class 6 felony for any person, firm, association, or corporation to knowingly sell, give, or distribute any pistol, shotgun, rifle, machine gun, or other firearm, except for an antique firearm, that has a serial number that has been removed, defaced, altered, changed, destroyed, or obliterated in any manner.



VCDL Comments
This bill corrects several issues with current law regarding serial numbers and allows guns with serial numbers unlawfully removed or defaced to be prosecuted in Virginia.
01/17/22  Senate: Presented and ordered printed 22104144D
01/17/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on the Judiciary
01/31/22  Senate: Assigned Judiciary sub: Criminal Law
02/07/22  Senate: Reported from Judiciary with substitute (10-Y 5-N)
02/07/22  Senate: Committee substitute printed 22105412D-S1
02/07/22  Senate: Rereferred to Finance and Appropriations
02/10/22  Senate: Reported from Finance and Appropriations with substitute (13-Y 3-N)
02/10/22  Senate: Committee substitute printed 22106305D-S2
02/11/22  Senate: Constitutional reading dispensed (40-Y 0-N)
02/14/22  Senate: Floor substitute printed 22106493D-S3 (DeSteph)
02/14/22  Senate: Passed by for the day
02/15/22  Senate: Read second time
02/15/22  Senate: Committee substitute rejected 22105412D-S1
02/15/22  Senate: Reading of substitute waived
02/15/22  Senate: Committee substitute agreed to (22-Y 18-N)
02/15/22  Senate: Title replaced 22106305D-S2
02/15/22  Senate: Engrossed by Senate - committee substitute SB643S2
02/15/22  Senate: Constitutional reading dispensed (40-Y 0-N)
02/15/22  Senate: Passed Senate (21-Y 19-N)
02/22/22  House: Placed on Calendar
02/22/22  House: Read first time
02/22/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/22/22  House: Assigned PS sub: Subcommittee #1
03/03/22  House: Subcommittee recommends laying on the table (6-Y 4-N)
03/08/22  House: Left in Public Safety
 
SB644      Patron: T. Travis Hackworth  -  all patrons                                       
Criminal history record information check required to sell firearm; exception for concealed handgun permit. Provides that a person may sell a firearm through a private sale to another person if the sale of a firearm is to a person who (i) has a valid Virginia resident concealed handgun permit, (ii) produces the permit to the seller at the time of sale, and (iii) is not prohibited under state or federal law from possessing a firearm.



VCDL Comments
This bill exempts CHP holders from Universal Background Checks.
01/17/22  Senate: Presented and ordered printed 22103391D
01/17/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on the Judiciary
01/26/22  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Judiciary (9-Y 6-N)
 
HB515      Patron: Marie E. March  -  all patrons                                       
Civil action for malicious prosecution; self-defense. Creates a civil cause of action for malicious prosecution in any case in which a criminal defendant charged with aggravated murder, murder in the first degree, murder in the second degree, or voluntary manslaughter is found to have acted solely in self-defense. The bill provides that such cause of action shall lie against the prosecutor who brought the charges or prosecuted such criminal case if such criminal defendant can prove that such prosecution was malicious and motivated by reasons other than bringing the alleged defendant to justice.



VCDL Comments
This bill allows for a civil suit against a prosecutor who maliciously prosecutes an individual for aggravated murder, murder in the first degree, murder in the second degree, or voluntary manslaughter and the individual is found to have acted solely in self-defense and the individual can prove such prosecution was malicious.
01/11/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22101853D
01/11/22  House: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
01/21/22  House: Assigned Courts sub: Subcommittee #2
01/24/22  House: Subcommittee recommends striking from docket (8-Y 0-N)
01/28/22  House: Stricken from docket by Courts of Justice (18-Y 0-N)
 
SB763      Patron: Mark D. Obenshain  -  all patrons                                       
Control of firearms by localities; concealed handgun permit exception. Provides that any local ordinance that prohibits the possession or carrying of firearms, ammunition, or components or any combination thereof in (i) any building, or part thereof, owned or used by such locality for governmental purposes; (ii) any public park owned or operated by the locality; (iii) any recreation or community center facility; or (iv) any public street, road, alley, sidewalk, or public right-of-way or any other place of whatever nature that is open to the public and is being used by or is adjacent to a permitted event or an event that would otherwise require a permit shall not apply to any person who holds a valid Virginia permit to carry a concealed handgun.



VCDL Comments
This bill exempts concealed handgun permit holders from local gun-control ordinances. SB 74 is preferable to SB 763, as it repeals the authority for local gun-control completely.
01/21/22  Senate: Presented and ordered printed 22102147D
01/21/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on the Judiciary
01/26/22  Senate: Incorporated by Judiciary (SB61-Hackworth) (15-Y 0-N)
 
HB26      Patron: Timothy V. Anderson  -  all patrons                                       
Control of firearms by localities. Removes the authority for a locality by ordinance to prohibit the possession or carrying of firearms, ammunition, or components or any combination thereof in (i) any building, or part thereof, owned or used by such locality for governmental purposes; (ii) any public park owned or operated by the locality; (iii) any recreation or community center facility; or (iv) any public street, road, alley, or sidewalk or public right-of-way or any other place of whatever nature that is open to the public and is being used by or is adjacent to a permitted event or an event that would otherwise require a permit. The bill provides that any firearm received by the locality pursuant to a buy-back program shall be offered for sale by public auction or sealed bids to a person licensed as a dealer. Current law provides that any such firearm shall be destroyed by the locality unless the person surrendering the firearm requests in writing that the firearm be offered for sale. The bill also limits the authority of localities and state governmental entities to bring lawsuits against certain firearms manufacturers and others.



VCDL Comments
This bill repeals the authority for localities to have an ordinance banning firearms in local government buildings, parks, recreation and community centers, and at events that are permitted, or should have been permitted. While only 16 out of 194 localities have such an ordinance, it still creates a web of laws that can trip up gun owners as they move around in the Commonwealth. No other civil right varies based on location. Because of the seriousness of gun-law penalties, gun laws should be uniform across the Commonwealth, as they had been from 2004 to 2020. None of the 16 localities could show a need for such an ordinance, but many claimed it would lower crime and make their locality safer. In reality, violent crime is up over 20%. In Alexandria, crime committed using a firearm skyrocketed 40% starting the very month that their ordinance went into effect and has stayed up. Richmond's violent crime is now back to the highs of decades ago. Disarming citizens in parks, which cannot be secured, puts citizens at unnecessary risk. The ban on guns at permitted, or should have been permitted, events is vague as to exactly what locations "open to the public" are included. Richmond has abused that part of the law by leaving signs up permanently on some streets, giving citizens the impossible task of determining if there is an event in the area that is permitted, or worse, should have been permitted. The 2020 change to the firearm preemption law was a classic example of fixing something that wasn't broken, and we need to restore the law as it was in 2019.
12/28/21  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22100806D
12/28/21  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/15/22  House: Left in Public Safety
 
SB74      Patron: Amanda F. Chase  -  all patrons                                       

Control of firearms by localities. Removes the authority for a locality by ordinance to prohibit the possession or carrying of firearms, ammunition, or components or any combination thereof in (i) any building, or part thereof, owned or used by such locality for governmental purposes; (ii) any public park owned or operated by the locality; (iii) any recreation or community center facility; or (iv) any public street, road, alley, or sidewalk or public right-of-way or any other place of whatever nature that is open to the public and is being used by or is adjacent to a permitted event or an event that would otherwise require a permit. The bill provides that any firearm received by the locality pursuant to a buy-back program shall be offered for sale by public auction or sealed bids to a person licensed as a dealer. Current law provides that any such firearm shall be destroyed by the locality unless the person surrendering the firearm requests in writing that the firearm be offered for sale. The bill also limits the authority of localities and state governmental entities to bring lawsuits against certain firearms manufacturers and others.



VCDL Comments
This bill repeals the authority for localities to have an ordinance banning firearms in local government buildings, parks, recreation and community centers, and at events that are permitted, or should have been permitted. While only 16 out of 194 localities have such an ordinance, it still creates a web of laws that can trip up gun owners as they move around in the Commonwealth. No other civil right varies based on location. Because of the seriousness of gun-law penalties, gun laws should be uniform across the Commonwealth, as they had been from 2004 to 2020. None of the 16 localities could show a need for such an ordinance, but many claimed it would lower crime and make their locality safer. In reality, violent crime is up over 20%. In Alexandria, crime committed using a firearm skyrocketed 40% starting the very month that their ordinance went into effect and has stayed up. Richmond's violent crime is now back to the highs of decades ago. Disarming citizens in parks, which cannot be secured, puts citizens at unnecessary risk. The ban on guns at permitted, or should have been permitted, events is vague as to exactly what locations "open to the public" are included. Richmond has abused that part of the law by leaving signs up permanently on some streets, giving citizens the impossible task of determining if there is an event in the area that is permitted, or worse, should have been permitted. The 2020 change to the firearm preemption law was a classic example of fixing something that wasn't broken, and we need to restore the law as it was in 2019.
01/04/22  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22101641D
01/04/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on the Judiciary
01/26/22  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Judiciary (9-Y 6-N)
 
SB75      Patron: Amanda F. Chase  -  all patrons                                       
Carrying a firearm or explosive material within Capitol Square and the surrounding area, into building owned or leased by the Commonwealth, etc.; penalty. Repeals the prohibition on carrying a firearm or explosive material within (i) the Capitol of Virginia; (ii) Capitol Square and the surrounding area; (iii) any building owned or leased by the Commonwealth or any agency thereof; or (iv) any office where employees of the Commonwealth or any agency thereof are regularly present for the purpose of performing their official duties. Current law makes it a Class 1 misdemeanor for any person to carry a firearm or explosive material within these areas, subject to certain exceptions, including the following individuals while acting in the conduct of such person's official duties: any law-enforcement officer, any authorized security personnel, any active military personnel, any fire marshal when such fire marshal has been granted police powers, or any member of a cadet corps while such member is participating in an official ceremonial event for the Commonwealth.



VCDL Comments
This bill repeals the prohibition on the otherwise lawful carrying of firearms in the Capitol, General Assembly Building, Capitol Square, and property that is owned or leased by the Commonwealth, such as rest stops, DMV, and ABC stores. People have been lawfully carrying in all those places for decades without incident and have a natural right to be able to defend themselves there.
01/04/22  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22101674D
01/04/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on Rules
02/11/22  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Rules (13-Y 3-N)
 
HB1051      Patron: Phillip A. Scott (by request)  -  all patrons                                       
Protective orders; possession of firearms. Allows a person subject to a protective order to continue to possess any firearm while in his place of residence that was possessed by such person at the time of service, provided that he is not otherwise prohibited by law from possessing a firearm. The bill removes the requirement that any person subject to a protective order must surrender his firearms within 24 hours of being served with a protective order.



VCDL Comments
This bill repeals the prohibition of someone subject to a protective order having firearms in their residence. The subject of the protective order may not knowingly possess or carry a firearm on their person outside their residence nor can they buy new firearms. The subject of the protection order should still be able to protect themselves while in their residence. The person who was awarded the protective order should have no reason to be at the residence of the subject of the order, as the point of the protective order is to keep the two people from interacting.
01/12/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22102583D
01/12/22  House: Referred to Committee on Rules
02/15/22  House: Left in Rules
 
HB1078      Patron: A.C. Cordoza  -  all patrons                                       
Limitations on use or transfer of firearms. Provides that certain provisions related to the sale or transfer of firearms do not prohibit the lawful transfer of firearms between certain family members. The bill also removes the brandishing of a firearm in such manner as to reasonably induce fear in the mind of another while assembled with one or more persons for the purpose of and with the intent to intimidate any person or group of persons from actions constituting the offense of unlawful paramilitary activity.



VCDL Comments
This bill clarifies that a transfer, but not a sale, between family members does not require a background check. It also removes a poorly worded and unenforceable part of the prohibition on paramilitary activities.
01/12/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22103855D
01/12/22  House: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
01/28/22  House: Referred from Courts of Justice by voice vote
01/28/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/01/22  House: Assigned PS sub: Subcommittee #1
02/10/22  House: Subcommittee recommends continuing to 2023 with substitute by voice vote
02/11/22  House: Continued to 2023 with substitute in Public Safety by voice vote
 
HB1166      Patron: C. Matthew Fariss  -  all patrons                                       
Carrying a firearm or explosive material within Capitol Square and the surrounding area, into building owned or leased by the Commonwealth, etc.; penalty. Repeals the prohibition on carrying a firearm or explosive material within (i) the Capitol of Virginia; (ii) Capitol Square and the surrounding area; (iii) any building owned or leased by the Commonwealth or any agency thereof; or (iv) any office where employees of the Commonwealth or any agency thereof are regularly present for the purpose of performing their official duties. Current law makes it a Class 1 misdemeanor for any person to carry a firearm or explosive material within these areas, subject to certain exceptions, including the following individuals while acting in the conduct of such person's official duties: any law-enforcement officer, any authorized security personnel, any active military personnel, any fire marshal when such fire marshal has been granted police powers, or any member of a cadet corps while such member is participating in an official ceremonial event for the Commonwealth.



VCDL Comments
This bill repeals the prohibition on the otherwise lawful carrying of firearms in the Capitol, General Assembly Building, Capitol Square, and property that is owned or leased by the Commonwealth, such as rest stops, DMV, and ABC stores. People have been lawfully carrying in all those places for decades without incident and have a natural right to be able to defend themselves there.
01/14/22  House: Presented and ordered printed 22103185D
01/14/22  House: Referred to Committee on Rules
02/15/22  House: Left in Rules
 
HB124      Patron: Scott A. Wyatt  -  all patrons                                       
Hunting deer; use of .22 caliber rifle authorized. Authorizes the use of a rifle equipped with .22 caliber centerfire ammunition for hunting big game. Current Department of Wildlife Resources regulations allow the use of rifles with a caliber of .23 or greater.



VCDL Comments
This bill allows .22 caliber centerfire cartridges to be used to hunt deer when used in a rifle. Other states have this same hunting provision.
01/07/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22101557D
01/07/22  House: Referred to Committee on Agriculture, Chesapeake and Natural Resources
01/31/22  House: Assigned ACNR sub: Natural Resources
02/02/22  House: Subcommittee recommends laying on the table (4-Y 2-N)
02/15/22  House: Left in Agriculture, Chesapeake and Natural Resources
 
SB61      Patron: T. Travis Hackworth  -  all patrons                                       
Firearms; concealed carry for law-enforcement officers, attorneys for the Commonwealth, and judges; exceptions to certain prohibited activities. Provides that any (i) active law-enforcement officer, (ii) qualified retired law-enforcement officer, (iii) attorney for the Commonwealth or assistant attorney for the Commonwealth, (iv) qualified retired attorney for the Commonwealth or retired assistant attorney for the Commonwealth, (v) judge or justice of the Commonwealth, or (vi) retired judge or retired justice of the Commonwealth may carry a concealed weapon about his person, hidden from common observation. The bill also permits such law-enforcement officers, retired law-enforcement officers, attorneys for the Commonwealth or assistant attorneys for the Commonwealth, qualified retired attorneys for the Commonwealth or retired assistant attorneys for the Commonwealth, judges or justices of the Commonwealth, and retired judges or justices of the Commonwealth to carry a firearm in many of the areas where firearms are prohibited from being carried.



VCDL Comments
This bill exempts certain retired and active government employees from gun laws that better-trained concealed handgun permit holders are not exempted from. The bill exempts retired or active Commonwealth Attorneys, Assistant Commonwealth Attorneys, and judges or justices of the Commonwealth from: local-government gun prohibitions, the Capitol Square and state agency gun prohibition (rest stops, General Assembly Building, DMV, ABC, etc.), the prohibition against loaded rifles or shotguns in a vehicle, guns in non-secure areas of airport terminals, on school property, and the prohibition against carry within 40 feet of a polling place. Retired and active Commonwealth Attorneys, judges, and justices have NO requirement for training, while concealed handgun permit holders DO have training. CHP holders have an exemplary record of carrying and using guns in a responsible and legal manner. There is no valid reason that CHP holders should not be allowed to carry in the same places and with the same exemptions as retired and active Commonwealth Attorneys, Assistant Commonwealth Attorneys, judges, and justices. SB 61 sets up a caste system with an entitled class of princelings with special privileges not afforded to "acommoners." VCDL does support the LEOSA training provision in the bill.
01/03/22  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22102035D
01/03/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on the Judiciary
01/26/22  Senate: Committee substitute printed to LIS only 22105297D-S1
01/26/22  Senate: Incorporates SB763 (Obenshain)
01/26/22  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Judiciary (9-Y 6-N)
 
SB269      Patron: John S. Edwards  -  all patrons                                       
Carrying a firearm or explosive material within Capitol Square and the surrounding area; exceptions for law-enforcement officers. Adds an exception for off-duty law-enforcement officers and retired law-enforcement officers to the prohibition of carrying a firearm within Capitol Square and the surrounding area, any building owned or leased by the Commonwealth or any agency thereof, or any office where employees of the Commonwealth or any agency thereof are regularly present for the purpose of performing their official duties.



VCDL Comments
This bill allows off-duty law enforcement to carry a firearm in Capitol Square and in state agency buildings. This bill creates an elite class of people based solely on their occupation. Is one person's life worth more than another's? Other bills have been introduced this year to repeal this code section entirely, which alleviates any perceived need for this bill.
01/11/22  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22103161D
01/11/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on Rules
02/11/22  Senate: Continued to 2023 in Rules (13-Y 2-N)
 
HB417      Patron: Jason S. Ballard  -  all patrons                                       
Carrying concealed weapons; members of the United States Armed Forces; permit not required. Provides that current members of the United States Armed Forces are not required to obtain a concealed handgun permit in order to carry a concealed weapon.



VCDL Comments
This bill allows active duty members of the armed forces, with military ID, to carry a concealed handgun without the need for permit. Constitutional Carry will make this bill moot.
01/11/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22101877D
01/11/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/15/22  House: Left in Public Safety
 
HB827      Patron: Tony O. Wilt  -  all patrons                                       

Control of firearms by localities. Removes the authority for a locality by ordinance to prohibit the possession or carrying of firearms, ammunition, or components or any combination thereof in (i) any building, or part thereof, owned or used by such locality for governmental purposes; (ii) any public park owned or operated by the locality; (iii) any recreation or community center facility; or (iv) any public street, road, alley, or sidewalk or public right-of-way or any other place of whatever nature that is open to the public and is being used by or is adjacent to a permitted event or an event that would otherwise require a permit. The bill provides that any firearm received by the locality pursuant to a buy-back program shall be offered for sale by public auction or sealed bids to a person licensed as a dealer. Current law provides that any such firearm shall be destroyed by the locality unless the person surrendering the firearm requests in writing that the firearm be offered for sale. The bill also limits the authority of localities and state governmental entities to bring lawsuits against certain firearms manufacturers and others.



VCDL Comments
This bill repeals the authority for localities to have an ordinance banning firearms in local government buildings, parks, recreation and community centers, and at events that are permitted, or should have been permitted. While only 16 out of 194 localities have such an ordinance, it still creates a web of laws that can trip up gun owners as they move around in the Commonwealth. No other civil right varies based on location. Because of the seriousness of gun-law penalties, gun laws should be uniform across the Commonwealth, as they had been from 2004 to 2020. None of the 16 localities could show a need for such an ordinance, but many claimed it would lower crime and make their locality safer. In reality, violent crime is up over 20%. In Alexandria, crime committed using a firearm skyrocketed 40% starting the very month that their ordinance went into effect and has stayed up. Richmond's violent crime is now back to the highs of decades ago. Disarming citizens in parks, which cannot be secured, puts citizens at unnecessary risk. The ban on guns at permitted, or should have been permitted, events is vague as to exactly what locations 'open to the public' are included. Richmond has abused that part of the law by leaving signs up permanently on some streets, giving citizens the impossible task of determining if there is an event in the area that is permitted, or worse, should have been permitted. The 2020 change to the firearm preemption law was a classic example of fixing something that wasn't broken, and we need to restore the law as it was in 2019.
01/12/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22100614D
01/12/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
01/26/22  House: Assigned PS sub: Subcommittee #1
01/27/22  House: Subcommittee recommends reporting (6-Y 4-N)
01/28/22  House: Reported from Public Safety (12-Y 10-N)
02/01/22  House: Read first time
02/02/22  House: Read second time and engrossed
02/03/22  House: Read third time and passed House (52-Y 48-N)
02/03/22  House: VOTE: Passage (52-Y 48-N)
02/04/22  Senate: Constitutional reading dispensed
02/04/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on the Judiciary
02/28/22  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Judiciary (9-Y 6-N)
 
HB1033      Patron: Glenn R. Davis  -  all patrons                                       

Control of firearms by localities. Removes the authority for a locality by ordinance to prohibit the possession or carrying of firearms, ammunition, or components or any combination thereof in (i) any building, or part thereof, owned or used by such locality for governmental purposes; (ii) any public park owned or operated by the locality; (iii) any recreation or community center facility; or (iv) any public street, road, alley, or sidewalk or public right-of-way or any other place of whatever nature that is open to the public and is being used by or is adjacent to a permitted event or an event that would otherwise require a permit. The bill provides that any firearm received by the locality pursuant to a buy-back program shall be offered for sale by public auction or sealed bids to a person licensed as a dealer. Current law provides that any such firearm shall be destroyed by the locality unless the person surrendering the firearm requests in writing that the firearm be offered for sale. The bill also limits the authority of localities and state governmental entities to bring lawsuits against certain firearms manufacturers and others.



VCDL Comments
This bill epeals the authority for localities to have an ordinance banning firearms in local government buildings, parks, recreation and community centers, and at events that are permitted, or should have been permitted. While only 16 out of 194 localities have such an ordinance, it still creates a web of laws that can trip up gun owners as they move around in the Commonwealth. No other civil right varies based on location. Because of the seriousness of gun-law penalties, gun laws should be uniform across the Commonwealth, as they had been from 2004 to 2020. None of the 16 localities could show a need for such an ordinance, but many claimed it would lower crime and make their locality safer. In reality, violent crime is up over 20%. In Alexandria, crime committed using a firearm skyrocketed 40% starting the very month that their ordinance went into effect and has stayed up. Richmond's violent crime is now back to the highs of decades ago. Disarming citizens in parks, which cannot be secured, puts citizens at unnecessary risk. The ban on guns at permitted, or should have been permitted, events is vague as to exactly what locations "open to the public" are included. Richmond has abused that part of the law by leaving signs up permanently on some streets, giving citizens the impossible task of determining if there is an event in the area that is permitted, or worse, should have been permitted. The 2020 change to the firearm preemption law was a classic example of fixing something that wasn't broken, and we need to restore the law as it was in 2019.
01/12/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22101875D
01/12/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/15/22  House: Left in Public Safety
 
SB592      Patron: Bill DeSteph  -  all patrons                                       
Group Violence Intervention Board; Division of Group Violence Intervention; Project Ceasefire Grant Fund; Project Exit Grant Fund; report. Establishes the Group Violence Intervention Board to coordinate and assist federal, state, and local group violence intervention efforts. The bill also establishes within the Department of Criminal Justice Services (the Department) the Division of Group Violence Intervention (the Division), to be headed by an executive director appointed by the Director of the Department. The bill provides that the Division is responsible for (i) coordinating the efforts of members of state and local law enforcement, community members, and social services providers to combat group violence; (ii) serving as a clearinghouse for research, best practices, and strategies that may be utilized in the implementation, execution, and evaluation of group violence interventions; and (iii) implementing and administering various federal, state, and local grant funds that aid group violence intervention efforts. Finally, the bill creates the Project Ceasefire Grant Fund, which provides money to organizations that are involved in group violence intervention efforts, and creates the Project Exit Grant Fund, which provides money to organizations that assist former gang members or individuals attempting to leave gangs.



VCDL Comments
This bill creates a Group Violence Intervention Board, focused on reducing violent crime committed by gangs using intervention, deterrence, and other things.
01/12/22  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22101708D
01/12/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on the Judiciary
02/02/22  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Judiciary (8-Y 6-N 1-A)
 
HB833      Patron: Tony O. Wilt  -  all patrons                                       
Group violence intervention; establishment of Operation Ceasefire Grant Fund. Creates the Operation Ceasefire Grant Fund (the Fund) to be managed by the Office of the Attorney General. The bill provides that moneys in the Fund shall be used to implement violent crime reduction strategies, to provide training for law-enforcement officers and prosecutors, to provide equipment for law-enforcement agencies, and to award grants to organizations that are involved in group violence intervention efforts. The bill defines "group violence intervention" as comprehensive law-enforcement, prosecutorial, and community-based initiatives, substantially similar to Operation Ceasefire as implemented in Boston, Massachusetts, and the Gang Reduction Programs implemented in Los Angeles, California, and Richmond.



VCDL Comments
This bill creates a Group Violence Intervention Board, focused on reducing violent crime committed by gangs using intervention, deterrence, and other things.
01/12/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22101707D
01/12/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
01/25/22  House: Assigned PS sub: Subcommittee #2
01/27/22  House: Subcommittee recommends reporting with substitute (7-Y 1-N)
01/27/22  House: Subcommittee recommends referring to Committee on Appropriations
01/28/22  House: Reported from Public Safety with substitute (13-Y 9-N)
01/28/22  House: Referred to Committee on Appropriations
01/28/22  House: Committee substitute printed 22105233D-H1
01/29/22  House: Assigned App. sub: Transportation & Public Safety
01/31/22  House: Subcommittee recommends reporting (7-Y 0-N)
01/31/22  House: Reported from Appropriations (22-Y 0-N)
02/02/22  House: Read first time
02/03/22  House: Read second time
02/03/22  House: Passed by for the day
02/04/22  House: Read second time
02/04/22  House: Committee substitute agreed to 22105233D-H1
02/04/22  House: Engrossed by House - committee substitute HB833H1
02/07/22  House: Read third time
02/07/22  House: Pending question ordered
02/07/22  House: Passed House (59-Y 40-N)
02/07/22  House: VOTE: Passage (59-Y 40-N)
02/08/22  Senate: Constitutional reading dispensed
02/08/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on General Laws and Technology
03/02/22  Senate: Reported from General Laws and Technology (13-Y 2-N)
03/02/22  Senate: Rereferred to Finance and Appropriations
03/03/22  Senate: Reported from Finance and Appropriations with substitute (13-Y 2-N)
03/03/22  Senate: Committee substitute printed 22107518D-S1
03/07/22  Senate: Constitutional reading dispensed (38-Y 0-N)
03/08/22  Senate: Read third time
03/08/22  Senate: Reading of substitute waived
03/08/22  Senate: Committee substitute agreed to 22107518D-S1
03/08/22  Senate: Engrossed by Senate - committee substitute HB833S1
03/08/22  Senate: Passed Senate with substitute (29-Y 10-N)
03/09/22  House: Senate substitute rejected by House 22107518D-S1 (10-Y 88-N)
03/09/22  House: VOTE: Rejected (10-Y 88-N)
03/10/22  Senate: Senate insisted on substitute (40-Y 0-N)
03/10/22  Senate: Senate requested conference committee
03/10/22  House: House acceded to request
03/10/22  House: Conferees appointed by House
03/10/22  House: Delegates: Wilt, Cordoza, Bulova
03/10/22  Senate: Conferees appointed by Senate
03/10/22  Senate: Senators: McClellan, Lucas, Vogel
03/12/22  House: Continued to 2022 Sp. Sess. 1 pursuant to HJR455
 
SB310      Patron: Adam P. Ebbin  -  all patrons                                       

Manufacture, import, sale, transfer, or possession of plastic firearms and unfinished frames or receivers and unserialized firearms; penalties. Creates a Class 5 felony for any person who manufactures, imports, sells, transfers, or possesses any firearm with a major component, as defined in the bill, that when subjected to inspection by the types of detection devices, including X-ray machines, commonly used at airports for security screening does not generate an image that accurately depicts the shape of the component. The bill updates language regarding the types of detection devices that are used at airports for detecting plastic firearms.



VCDL Comments
This bill makes the possession, transfer, sale, or manufacture of a homemade gun a crime, unless at some point federal law requires a frame to be serialized and a federal firearms importer or a federal firearms manufacturer has serialized the frame. This bill would make existing homemade guns illegal and would make 80% receivers illegal, turning innocent citizens into criminals overnight, with no compensation for the loss of their previously legal gun or 80% frame. Like the proverbial "bull in a china shop," this bill is tinkering with extremely complicated gun laws.
01/11/22  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22103963D
01/11/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on the Judiciary
01/31/22  Senate: Assigned Judiciary sub: Criminal Law
02/07/22  Senate: Reported from Judiciary with substitute (9-Y 4-N)
02/07/22  Senate: Committee substitute printed 22105984D-S1
02/07/22  Senate: Rereferred to Finance and Appropriations
02/10/22  Senate: Reported from Finance and Appropriations (12-Y 4-N)
02/11/22  Senate: Constitutional reading dispensed (40-Y 0-N)
02/14/22  Senate: Read second time
02/14/22  Senate: Reading of substitute waived
02/14/22  Senate: Committee substitute agreed to 22105984D-S1
02/14/22  Senate: Engrossed by Senate - committee substitute SB310S1
02/15/22  Senate: Read third time and passed Senate (22-Y 18-N)
02/21/22  House: Placed on Calendar
02/21/22  House: Read first time
02/21/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/22/22  House: Assigned PS sub: Subcommittee #1
02/25/22  House: Tabled in Public Safety (12-Y 10-N)
 
HB399      Patron: Marcus B. Simon  -  all patrons                                       

Manufacture, import, sale, transfer, or possession of plastic firearms and unfinished frames or receivers and unserialized firearms; penalties. Creates a Class 5 felony for any person who manufactures, imports, sells, transfers, or possesses any firearm with a major component, as defined in the bill, that when subjected to inspection by the types of detection devices, including X-ray machines, commonly used at airports for security screening does not generate an image that accurately depicts the shape of the component. The bill updates language regarding the types of detection devices that are used at airports for detecting plastic firearms.



VCDL Comments
This bill makes the possession, transfer, sale, or manufacture of a homemade gun a crime, unless at some point federal law requires a frame to be serialized and a federal firearms importer or a federal firearms manufacturer has serialized the frame. This bill would make existing homemade guns illegal and would make 80% receivers illegal, turning innocent citizens into criminals overnight, with no compensation for the loss of their previously legal gun or 80% frame. Like the proverbial "bull in a china shop," this bill is tinkering with extremely complicated gun laws.
01/11/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22103868D
01/11/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/01/22  House: Assigned PS sub: Subcommittee #1
02/03/22  House: Subcommittee recommends passing by indefinitely (6-Y 4-N)
02/15/22  House: Left in Public Safety
 
SB487      Patron: Jennifer L. McClellan  -  all patrons                                       
Virginia Center for Firearm Violence Intervention and Prevention; Virginia Firearm Violence Intervention and Prevention Fund; creation. Establishes the Virginia Center for Firearm Violence Intervention and Prevention (the Center) within the Department of Criminal Justice Services and transfers to the Center the administration of the existing Virginia Gun Violence Intervention and Prevention Fund.



VCDL Comments
This bill creates a Virginia Center for Firearm Violence Intervention and Prevention. The sole focus in firearms and the description of the proposed center make it clear this is political and not about finding solutions. Violence is violence. The violent person is the problem, not whatever tool that is used.
01/11/22  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22103607D
01/11/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on the Judiciary
02/02/22  Senate: Reported from Judiciary (9-Y 6-N)
02/02/22  Senate: Rereferred to Finance and Appropriations
02/09/22  Senate: Reported from Finance and Appropriations (12-Y 3-N 1-A)
02/10/22  Senate: Constitutional reading dispensed (40-Y 0-N)
02/11/22  Senate: Read second time and engrossed
02/14/22  Senate: Read third time and passed Senate (24-Y 16-N)
02/21/22  House: Placed on Calendar
02/21/22  House: Read first time
02/21/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
03/01/22  House: Assigned PS sub: Subcommittee #1
03/03/22  House: Subcommittee recommends reporting with substitute (10-Y 0-N)
03/04/22  House: Reported from Public Safety with substitute (16-Y 6-N)
03/04/22  House: Committee substitute printed 22107374D-H1
03/08/22  House: Read second time
03/09/22  House: Read third time
03/09/22  House: Committee substitute agreed to 22107374D-H1
03/09/22  House: Engrossed by House - committee substitute SB487H1
03/09/22  House: Passed House with substitute (61-Y 38-N)
03/09/22  House: VOTE: Passage (61-Y 38-N)
03/10/22  Senate: House substitute rejected by Senate (17-Y 23-N)
03/10/22  House: House insisted on substitute
03/10/22  House: House requested conference committee
03/10/22  Senate: Senate acceded to request (40-Y 0-N)
03/10/22  Senate: Conferees appointed by Senate
03/10/22  Senate: Senators: McClellan, Lucas, Vogel
03/10/22  House: Conferees appointed by House
03/10/22  House: Delegates: Wilt, Cordoza, Bulova
03/12/22  Senate: Continued to 2022 Sp. Sess. 1 pursuant to HJR455
 
HB590      Patron: Schuyler T. VanValkenburg  -  all patrons                                       

Storage of firearms in residence where minor present; penalty. Requires any person who possesses a firearm in a residence where such person knows or reasonably should know that a minor under 18 years of age is present to store such firearm unloaded in a locked container, compartment, or cabinet, and to store all ammunition in a separate locked container, compartment, or cabinet. The bill requires that the key or combination to such locked containers, compartments, or cabinets be inaccessible to minors. The bill provides that a violation is a Class 1 misdemeanor, and, in a case where there is more than one firearm stored in violation of these provisions, each firearm shall constitute a separate Class 1 misdemeanor. The bill exempts any person in lawful possession of a firearm who exercises immediate control, defined in the bill, and when the firearm is an antique firearm.



VCDL Comments
This bill requires a gun owner in a house where there is a person under 18 to either have a firearm under their immediate control or to store the firearm unloaded in a locked container and the ammunition in a separate locked container. This would make it illegal for someone to have a loaded firearm in a locked container, such as a biometric safe, for use in case of emergency. Also, this is a one-size-fits-all, not recognizing the difference in maturity levels children can have. Children under the age of 18 have used firearms to stop violent home invasions or other serious crimes taking place in their home.
01/11/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22103827D
01/11/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/01/22  House: Assigned PS sub: Subcommittee #1
02/03/22  House: Subcommittee recommends passing by indefinitely (6-Y 4-N)
02/15/22  House: Left in Public Safety
 
HB798      Patron: Marcia S. "Cia" Price  -  all patrons                                       
Gun Violence Survivor Assistance Fund and Grant Program. Establishes the Gun Violence Survivor Assistance Fund and Grant Program, to be administered by the Department of Criminal Justice Services for the purpose of providing grants to gun violence survivors who are in need of financial assistance to make accessibility adaptations to their homes to accommodate a disability resulting from a gun violence-related injury.



VCDL Comments
This bill creates a fund for "gun violence survivors." This bill is playing politics with taxpayer money and implying that guns are the only thing that can be misused to harm others, while ignoring other kinds of violence.
01/12/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22101216D
01/12/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/09/22  House: Tabled in Public Safety (12-Y 10-N)
 
HB825      Patron: Marcia S. "Cia" Price  -  all patrons                                       
Virginia Center for Firearm Violence Intervention and Prevention; Virginia Firearm Violence Intervention and Prevention Fund; creation. Establishes the Virginia Center for Firearm Violence Intervention and Prevention (the Center) within the Department of Criminal Justice Services and transfers to the Center the administration of the existing Virginia Gun Violence Intervention and Prevention Fund.



VCDL Comments
This bill creates a Virginia Center for Firearm Violence Intervention and Prevention. The sole focus in firearms and the description of the proposed center make it clear this is political and not about finding solutions. Violence is violence. The violent person is the problem, not whatever tool that is used.
01/12/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22103604D
01/12/22  House: Referred to Committee on General Laws
02/01/22  House: Referred from General Laws by voice vote
02/01/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/09/22  House: Assigned PS sub: Subcommittee #1
02/10/22  House: Subcommittee recommends laying on the table (6-Y 4-N)
02/15/22  House: Left in Public Safety
 
HB1096      Patron: Jason S. Ballard  -  all patrons                                       
Law-enforcement officers; retired law-enforcement officers; carrying a firearm or explosive material within Capitol Square and the surrounding area. Exempts any law-enforcement officer from the prohibition on carrying a firearm or explosive material within the Capitol of Virginia and Capitol Square and the surrounding area. The bill further allows any law-enforcement officer or qualified retired law-enforcement officer to carry a firearm or explosive material within any building owned or leased by the Commonwealth or any agency thereof, or any office where employees of the Commonwealth or agency thereof are regularly present to perform their official duties. Under current law, a law-enforcement officer is exempted only while acting in the conduct of his official duties, and a retired law-enforcement officer is limited to carrying a firearm while visiting a gun range owned or leased by the Commonwealth. The bill also clarifies that "Capitol Square and the surrounding area" as defined in current law does not include any public road or highway.



VCDL Comments
This bill allows retired or off duty law enforcement to carry a firearm in Capitol Square and in state agency buildings. This bill creates an elite class of people based solely on their current or previous occupation. Is one person's life worth more than another's? Other bills have been introduced this year to repeal this code section entirely, which alleviates any perceived need for this bill.
01/12/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22101445D
01/12/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/15/22  House: Left in Public Safety
 
HB929      Patron: Amanda E. Batten (by request)  -  all patrons                                       
Transfer of certain firearms; criminal history record information check; exemption. Provides that persons who hold a federal firearms license Type 03 - Collector of Curios and Relics are exempt from the criminal history record information check requirements to purchase certain firearms.



VCDL Comments
This bill exempts holders of a federal "curios and relics" license from a background check when purchasing a firearm.
01/12/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22102470D
01/12/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/01/22  House: Assigned PS sub: Subcommittee #1
02/03/22  House: Subcommittee recommends reporting (6-Y 4-N)
02/04/22  House: Reported from Public Safety (12-Y 10-N)
02/08/22  House: Motion to refer to committee agreed to
02/08/22  House: Referred to Committee on Appropriations
02/08/22  House: Read first time
02/15/22  House: Left in Appropriations
 
HB483      Patron: Nicholas J. Freitas  -  all patrons                                       

Control of firearms by localities. Removes the authority for a locality by ordinance to prohibit the possession or carrying of firearms, ammunition, or components or any combination thereof in (i) any building, or part thereof, owned or used by such locality for governmental purposes; (ii) any public park owned or operated by the locality; (iii) any recreation or community center facility; or (iv) any public street, road, alley, or sidewalk or public right-of-way or any other place of whatever nature that is open to the public and is being used by or is adjacent to a permitted event or an event that would otherwise require a permit. The bill provides that any firearm received by the locality pursuant to a buy-back program shall be offered for sale by public auction or sealed bids to a person licensed as a dealer. Current law provides that any such firearm shall be destroyed by the locality unless the person surrendering the firearm requests in writing that the firearm be offered for sale. The bill also limits the authority of localities and state governmental entities to bring lawsuits against certain firearms manufacturers and others.



VCDL Comments
This bill repeals the authority for localities to have an ordinance banning firearms in local government buildings, parks, recreation and community centers, and at events that are permitted, or should have been permitted. While only 16 out of 194 localities have such an ordinance, it still creates a web of laws that can trip up gun owners as they move around in the Commonwealth. No other civil right varies based on location. Because of the seriousness of gun-law penalties, gun laws should be uniform across the Commonwealth, as they had been from 2004 to 2020. None of the 16 localities could show a need for such an ordinance, but many claimed it would lower crime and make their locality safer. In reality, violent crime is up over 20%. In Alexandria, crime committed using a firearm skyrocketed 40% starting the very month that their ordinance went into effect and has stayed up. Richmond's violent crime is now back to the highs of decades ago. Disarming citizens in parks, which cannot be secured, puts citizens at unnecessary risk. The ban on guns at permitted, or should have been permitted, events is vague as to exactly what locations 'open to the public' are included. Richmond has abused that part of the law by leaving signs up permanently on some streets, giving citizens the impossible task of determining if there is an event in the area that is permitted, or worse, should have been permitted. The 2020 change to the firearm preemption law was a classic example of fixing something that wasn't broken, and we need to restore the law as it was in 2019.
01/11/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22101822D
01/11/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/15/22  House: Left in Public Safety
 
HB509      Patron: Marie E. March  -  all patrons                                       
Firearms; removal from persons posing substantial risk; penalties. Repeals the procedure by which any attorney for the Commonwealth or law-enforcement officer may apply to a general district court, circuit court, or juvenile and domestic relations district court judge or magistrate for an emergency substantial risk order to prohibit a person who poses a substantial risk of injury to himself or others from purchasing, possessing, or transporting a firearm. The bill also removes the substantial risk order registry for the entry of orders issued.



VCDL Comments
This bill epeals "Red Flag" Substantial Risk Orders (SROs). SROs don't get any help for a person in crisis, they only confiscate that person's firearms. This does nothing to prevent the person from committing suicide or harming others. SROs also do not give a person a chance to defend the accusation against them for two weeks. Justice delayed is justice denied. Virginia's Temporary Restraining Orders have existed for years and DO get a person in crisis help and they only take away a person's right to possess firearms after it is determined by medical experts that the person actually does need help.
01/11/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22101051D
01/11/22  House: Referred to Committee on Rules
02/03/22  House: Referred from Rules by voice vote
02/03/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/09/22  House: Assigned PS sub: Subcommittee #1
02/10/22  House: Subcommittee recommends reporting (6-Y 4-N)
02/11/22  House: Reported from Public Safety (11-Y 10-N)
02/13/22  House: Read first time
02/14/22  House: Read second time
02/14/22  House: Pending question ordered
02/14/22  House: Engrossed by House (52-Y 46-N)
02/14/22  House: VOTE: Engrossment (52-Y 46-N)
02/15/22  House: Read third time and passed House (52-Y 47-N)
02/15/22  House: VOTE: Passage (52-Y 47-N)
02/16/22  Senate: Constitutional reading dispensed
02/16/22  Senate: Referred to Committee on the Judiciary
02/28/22  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Judiciary (9-Y 6-N)
 
HB513      Patron: Marie E. March  -  all patrons                                       
Carrying a firearm or explosive material within Capitol Square and the surrounding area, into building owned or leased by the Commonwealth, etc.; penalty. Repeals the prohibition on carrying a firearm or explosive material within (i) the Capitol of Virginia; (ii) Capitol Square and the surrounding area; (iii) any building owned or leased by the Commonwealth or any agency thereof; or (iv) any office where employees of the Commonwealth or any agency thereof are regularly present for the purpose of performing their official duties. Current law makes it a Class 1 misdemeanor for any person to carry a firearm or explosive material within these areas, subject to certain exceptions, including the following individuals while acting in the conduct of such person's official duties: any law-enforcement officer, any authorized security personnel, any active military personnel, any fire marshal when such fire marshal has been granted police powers, or any member of a cadet corps while such member is participating in an official ceremonial event for the Commonwealth.



VCDL Comments
This bill repeals the prohibition on the otherwise lawful carrying of firearms in the Capitol, General Assembly Building, Capitol Square, and property that is owned or leased by the Commonwealth, such as rest stops, DMV, and ABC stores. People have been lawfully carrying in all those places for decades without incident and have a natural right to be able to defend themselves there.
01/11/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22101405D
01/11/22  House: Referred to Committee on Rules
02/15/22  House: Left in Rules
 
HB597      Patron: Don L. Scott  -  all patrons                                       
Concealed handgun permits; penalties. Changes the penalty for a first violation of carrying a concealed weapon without a permit from a Class 1 misdemeanor to a civil penalty of not more than $100, a second violation from a Class 6 felony to a civil penalty of not more than $500, and a third or subsequent violation from a Class 5 felony to a civil penalty of not more than $1,000. The bill also provides that a person, unless otherwise disqualified, shall not be precluded from applying for a concealed handgun permit during the pendency of the proceedings for a violation. If such person is issued a valid concealed handgun permit while a charge is pending, he may offer such permit to the court and the court may dismiss the charge.



VCDL Comments
This bill reduces the penalties for carrying a concealed handgun without a CHP. The first offense is up to a $100 civil penalty, which avoids criminalizing someone who is innocently carrying a concealed handgun and is unaware of the requirement for a CHP or is unaware the method of carry is considered 'concealed.' The second offense is raised up to a $500 civil penalty, and subsequent offenses are up to a $1,000 civil penalty. If a person acquires a valid CHP while awaiting trial, which the bill allows for, the judge may dismiss the charge. This bill is preferred over HB 11, which for a second and subsequent offense, raises the penalty up to a misdemeanor.
01/11/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22103018D
01/11/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/11/22  House: Stricken from docket by Public Safety (20-Y 1-N)
 
HB924      Patron: Amanda E. Batten (by request)  -  all patrons                                       
Limitation on handgun purchases; exemptions; penalty. Adds a federal law-enforcement officer to the list of those exempted from the prohibition on purchasing more than one handgun in a 30-day period.



VCDL Comments
This bill exempts federal law enforcement from Virginia's One Handgun a Month gun-rationing scheme.
01/12/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22100944D
01/12/22  House: Referred to Committee on Public Safety
02/15/22  House: Left in Public Safety
 
HB133      Patron: Mike A. Cherry  -  all patrons                                       
Possession of firearms or other weapons on school property. Removes preschools and licensed child day centers that are not operated at the residence of the provider or of any of the children from the list of schools where possessing a firearm or other weapon on school property or on a school bus is prohibited.



VCDL Comments
This bill repeals the prohibition of firearms on public and private preschool and child day center property that was passed into law in 2020. The current law was not put in place because of any issues and causes a nightmare for churches, many of which have a preschool, a child day center, or both. It also causes problems for businesses that offer a child day center for employees. There is no way to know what parts of the property is considered a preschool or a child day center. The penalty for an innocent mistake is a Class 6 felony.
01/07/22  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 01/12/22 22102275D
01/07/22  House: Referred to Committee on Rules
02/15/22  House: Left in Rules